Like Tears In The Rain

Apr 24

[video]

subbieblackgrl:

howtobeterrell:

anothergirlontheirt:

jadedid:

deejaybird:

Cudjoe Lewis is believed to be the last African born on African soil and brought to the United States by the transatlantic slave trade. He was a native of Takon, Benin, where he was captured in 1860 during an illegal slave-trading venture. Congress outlawed the importation of slaves in 1808. Together with more than a hundred other captured Africans, he was brought on the ship Clotilde to Mobile, Alabama. Cudjoe and 31 other enslaved Africans were taken to the property owned by Timothy Meaher, shipbuilder and owner of the Clotilde. 5 years later slavery was over so Cudjoe and his tribespeople requested to be taken back to Africa, but it was left ignored. He and other Africans established a community near Mobile, Alabama which became called Africatown. They maintained their African language and tribal customs well into the 1950s. He died in 1934 at the age of 94. Before he died, he gave several interviews on his experiences including one to the writer Zora Neale Hurston. During her interview in 1928, she made a short film of Cudjoe, the only moving image that exists in the Western Hemisphere of an African transported through the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

Between Zora and Du Bois… seriously. They did everything I can only hope to be able to scratch the surface of doing.

Nothing I or you ever do will match this. Effing amazing.

I have this film of him, that Zora recorded

I appreciate this. 

subbieblackgrl:

howtobeterrell:

anothergirlontheirt:

jadedid:

deejaybird:

Cudjoe Lewis is believed to be the last African born on African soil and brought to the United States by the transatlantic slave trade. He was a native of Takon, Benin, where he was captured in 1860 during an illegal slave-trading venture. Congress outlawed the importation of slaves in 1808. Together with more than a hundred other captured Africans, he was brought on the ship Clotilde to Mobile, Alabama. Cudjoe and 31 other enslaved Africans were taken to the property owned by Timothy Meaher, shipbuilder and owner of the Clotilde. 5 years later slavery was over so Cudjoe and his tribespeople requested to be taken back to Africa, but it was left ignored. He and other Africans established a community near Mobile, Alabama which became called Africatown. They maintained their African language and tribal customs well into the 1950s. He died in 1934 at the age of 94. Before he died, he gave several interviews on his experiences including one to the writer Zora Neale Hurston. During her interview in 1928, she made a short film of Cudjoe, the only moving image that exists in the Western Hemisphere of an African transported through the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

Between Zora and Du Bois… seriously. They did everything I can only hope to be able to scratch the surface of doing.

Nothing I or you ever do will match this. Effing amazing.

I have this film of him, that Zora recorded

I appreciate this. 

(via steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep)

yzma:

she’s turning 30 this year


Dear god she’s my age? *crumples into ball*

yzma:

she’s turning 30 this year

Dear god she’s my age? *crumples into ball*

(via orjdan)

[video]

[video]

[video]

sandandglass:

crispy-tacos:

flogicallylawless:

If Fox thinks that a Muslim can’t write a book about Christianity

would they agree that men can’t write legislation about women?

EVERYBODY FREEZE.

image

(via motorclit)

[video]

OH GOD ITS SO FLUFFYI need those seat covers in black for the Thunderhorse

OH GOD ITS SO FLUFFY


I need those seat covers in black for the Thunderhorse

(Source: badgalbarbie, via hellomissmayhem)

fablesandgables:

Signature of Sultan Süleiman the Magnificent (ca. 1555-1560)
Turkey, Istanbul
Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper
H. 20 1/2 in. (52.1 cm) W. 25 3/8 in. (64.5 cm)

fablesandgables:

Signature of Sultan Süleiman the Magnificent (ca. 1555-1560)

Turkey, Istanbul

Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper

H. 20 1/2 in. (52.1 cm) W. 25 3/8 in. (64.5 cm)

(Source: metmuseum.org, via theeverydaygoth)